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Communiqué of Canada’s First Ministers

From the Prime Minister’s Web Site (http://pm.gc.ca/)

Canada’s First Ministers today issued a joint communiqué following the First Ministers’ Meeting and released a declaration on clean growth and climate change:

“In the spirit of cooperation and collaboration, we met today to discuss the economy and actions to address climate change and agreed on immediate work to support growth and create new jobs.

“Building on commitments and actions already taken by provinces and territories and the momentum from COP21 in Paris, we are moving toward a pan-Canadian framework for clean growth and climate change that will meet or exceed Canada’s international emissions targets, and will transition our country to a stronger, more resilient, low-carbon economy – while also improving our quality of life.

“We know that a fair transition to a sustainable, low-carbon economy is necessary for our collective prosperity, competitiveness, health, and security. Taking smart and effective action today is essential for future generations. These decisions will put Canada at the forefront of the global clean growth economy, and will create opportunities to diversify our economies, open up access to new markets, reduce emissions, and generate good paying, long-term jobs for Canadians. Read more

A carbon budget for Canada

A collaborative framework for federal and provincial climate leadership

Last month,  we recommended the analysis of carbon budgets coming out of Simon Fraser University. West Coast Environmental Law practice, an organisation we equally admire and support, also bring their analyses to the table. Again, with the carbon budget for Canada, they propose ideas on how to deliver it, looking at the responsibilities of the Federal and provincial governments, their communications, the legal and financial requirements to ensure targets are met. Looking at conditions for best practices in other countries like the UK, the new government is at a ripe time to show leadership and gutsy policies.

Pathway to Paris #17: What are the pathways to deep decarbonization?

A biweekly climate briefing for municipalities

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In this Issue #17

  • Another remarkable speech
  • Pathways to Deep Decarbonization
  • The climate justice movement prepares for Paris
  • Game-changing act of diplomacy between US and China
  • Momentum for Change: the best ideas
  • Diplomats raise hopes for deal to cut greenhouse gases
  • Interesting week for Shell
  • Latin America and European cities are least dependent on fossil fuels
  • Pathway to Paris: POP Montreal
  • Featured network: United Cities and Local Governments

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Another remarkable speech

Following shortly on the coattails of a flurry of powerful speeches touching on climate change by the Pope in the US (for example, was a remarkable commentary by the Governor of the Bank of England that sent shockwaves through the business sections of the media. Speaking at Lloyd’s, a major insurance company, Mark Carney pointed out that once climate change becomes a defining issue for financial stability, it may already be too late- he called this the Tragedy of the Horizon. He also pointed to three types of risks:

Read more

Breaking news: The White House Issues Joint Presidential Statement on Climate Change with China

The United States and China Issue Joint Presidential Statement on Climate Change with New Domestic Policy Commitments and a Common Vision for an Ambitious Global Climate Agreement in Paris

On the occasion of President Xi’s State Visit to Washington, D.C., the United States and China today marked another major milestone in their joint leadership in the fight against climate change with the release of a U.S.-China Joint Presidential Statement on Climate Change. The Statement, which builds on last November’s historic announcement by President Obama and President Xi of ambitious, respective post-2020 climate targets, describes a common vision for a new global climate agreement to be concluded in Paris this December.  The Statement also includes significant domestic policy announcements and commitments to global climate finance, demonstrating the determination of both countries to act decisively to achieve the goals set last year. Read more

Putting a Price on Carbon

From our one of our Office of Research Projects: MC3

Canada’s Ecofiscal Commission has released a report outlining how Canada can quickly and efficiently reduce carbon emissions. Their proposal? Every province in Canada should put a price on carbon. They argue that “strong provincial carbon pricing policies… make good economic sense for every province—and for Canada as a whole. Designing those policies to recognize essential economic differences as well as different provincial priorities is nothing more than practical.” The report echoes the number one policy orientation of the Sustainable Canada Dialogue, Acting on Climate Change.

The success of the BC Carbon Tax provides evidence that putting a price on carbon can reduce emissions without adversely affecting the economy. Furthermore, the fact that Quebec and Alberta, with their disparate political cultures and economic foundations, have both adopted carbon pricing, demonstrates that policies can be tailored to the provincial context, achieving carbon reductions efficiently.
– See more at: http://www.mc-3.ca/blog/putting-price-carbon#sthash.kqw70vvI.dpuf