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How do you convince your CFO or the City Council that your triple bottom line proposal will benefit the environment, society and the economy?

Key financial tools in sustainable community development and how to use them

How do you convince your Chief Financial Officer or the City Council that your triple bottom line proposal will benefit the environment, society and the economy?
Mark Pezarro shares several tools and techniques to make a persuasive argument for sustainability in financial terms. This webinar focuses on specific tools and approaches for “making the case” for sustainability projects and introduces real world examples ranging from district energy systems to urban agriculture.
It begins with an overview of key economic and financial concepts for evaluating the financial viability of major capital investments, and then delves into a number of techniques to foster triple bottom line decision making before wrapping up with some examples of how this works in practice.

Watch Part I here and register for Part II here!

 

 

Implementing Decarbonisation

How does SSG help cities evaluate and implement decarbonisation paths?

This year, SSG released an integrated energy, emissions and finance model, CityInSight, designed specifically to support cities in identifying and implementing low carbon or decarbonisation pathways.

As part of our series of webinars on this model, here the fourth in the series here.

Hosted by Yuill Herbert from SSG and Marcus Williams from whatif Technologies, they will describe the design of the model with an update of it’s application.
SSG has partnered with whatIf? Technologies, an international leader in simulation modelling, to increase the sophistication, scope and capabilities of GHGProof in a new model – CityInSight. CityInSight also incorporates the Global GHG Protocol for Cities, a GHG accounting framework launched as the new global standard by the World Resources Institute, ICLEI, C40, UN Habitat and others at the UN Conference of the Parties in Lima in 2014..

SSG Summer 2015 review

Our monthly newsletter on news and inspiration at the nexus of sustainability

This month we decided to run a review of where SSG is at and what we have learnt over the past six months from the diverse projects we have completed, and ones we have started. Extreme weather planning for farms, to greenhouse gas inventories to Brownfield guidebooks and e-dialogues. The content got a bit long, so we’ve kept it to a few examples, and next month we’ll include more. Please let us know your feedback and thoughts.

[Recently completed]

“Cold what cold. People like to walk in Yellowknife”

Jeremy - Yellowknife 2

First GHG Inventory in Canada to use the GHGProtocol for Cities

This year we completed a GHG Inventory Report for the City of Yellowknife. The project involved developing a ground-up GHG and energy model for the City of Yellowknife based on land-use and other assumptions to develop a business as usual scenario, the first inventory that we know of in Canada to use the GHGProtocol for Cities. The City spent an estimated $140 million in 2014, approximately $19,800 per household. One remarkable fact about Yellowknife is that 13% of all trips are by walking, an exceptionally high mode share for cities of this size. In part at least, this statistic is a function of the City being a compact community.

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The pressure mounts with 87 days to go until #COP21

A biweekly climate briefing for municipalities

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In this Issue #15

  • A UN meeting in Bonn with [mostly] hopeful results
  • Country commitments are falling way short of expectations
  • Under 1.5C is cheaper than high carbon business
  • Islamic scholars follow the lead of Pope Francis II
  • Overcoming the gap: is the solution in non-state actors?
  • News from other networks
  • Featured network: Compact of States and Regions

 

On the road to Paris; a UN meeting in Bonn with [mostly] hopeful results

Negotiators met in Bonn this week to continue narrowing in on the elements of the Paris agreement, with nation states putting forward their preferences for a formal agreement. A series of high level meetings will follow where ministers seek to overcome a number of roadblocks. On the sidelines, campaigners joined climate vulnerable countries to ask to prioritise the loss & damage sections of the agreement that provide compensation to countries which experience the impacts of climate change, for example those who are displaced. Many developed countries have opposed the loss and damage mechanism but the discussions are increasingly constructive. The general tone as a result of the Bonn meetings is hopeful for a meaningful agreement in Paris. For a detailed review, see this press conference. Similarly, if you wish to see more and catch up with other webinars and ongoing, see this page for recordings.

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SSG Newswire June 2015: How does our work at the provincial level affect the bigger picture?

A monthly newsletter on news and inspiration at the nexus of sustainability

[Recently completed]

Future Oxford: our plan is endorsed by Council

“Community’s vision for its future emphasizes education and creativity, a growing sustainable economy, and environmental leadership”.

A year and a day after the Community Sustainability Plan Steering Committee was announced, the final draft of Oxford’s first Community Sustainability Plan was tabled and endorsed at County Council last week. We have worked with them and our partners InDeco since 2014 in a thorough and ambitious public engagement process. Online, this included a website futureoxford.ca (http://www.futureoxford.ca/) and related social media tools and offline, World Cafe’s and a competition for community members and students to envision Oxford County life in 2030, using video, artwork or writing. They also recently gained attention for their aspirational target to be 100% renewable by 2050! Read more

Final draft of Community Sustainability Plan tabled for Council approvals

Community’s vision for its future emphasizes education and creativity, a growing sustainable economy, and environmental leadership

A year and a day after the Community Sustainability Plan Steering Committee was announced, the final draft of Oxford’s first-ever Community Sustainability Plan was tabled—and endorsed– at County Council as the first in a series of council presentations that will continue at local area municipalities over the coming weeks.

Future Oxford: A Community Sustainability Plan sets out the community’s vision for how we will manage human (community), natural (environmental) and financial (economic) resources for Oxford County’s future growth and wellbeing.
The final draft Plan, which can be viewed at FutureOxford.ca, sets out 70 distinct actions including:
• reducing the percentage of Oxford County residents living in poverty;
• increasing the number of residents with post-secondary education;
• increasing participation in arts, recreation, and culture activities;
• growing jobs relative to population growth;
• encouraging production and consumption of locally produced food and products; and
• achieving the highest total waste diversion rate per capita in Ontario.

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