Associate Webinar: Brennan Vogel on sub-national approaches to climate change adaptation

Continuing our series of Associate webinars after Lindsay’s excellent kick-off, Brennan Vogel, Associate of SSG and PhD candidate will present and discuss his research focused on sub-national approaches to climate change adaptation in Canada. Brennan will share empirical evidence and analysis of the social factors that enable and constrain adaptation at the local scale, based on comparative case study analysis of Nova Scotia’s MCCAP policy process at inter-related Municipal and Provincial scales. The webinar will share the results of this work. Vogel’s PhD research has focused on a comparative analysis of the Nova Scotia ‘Municipal Climate Change Action Plans’ (MCCAPs). In Canada, MCCAPs are the only Provincial example of a policy instrument to monetize vulnerability assessment and adaptation planning for Canadian Municipalities, utilizing the Federal Gas Tax policy instrument to financially leverage and incentivize adaptation planning for local stakeholders. 

Please register for ‘Sub-national approaches to climate change adaptation’ on October 21st, 2015 1:00 PM EDT at:

https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/881849484181215385

Brennan’s PhD research has contributed methodological innovation (Vogel and Henstra, 2015; GEC 31:110-120) for conducting comparative analysis of adaptation planning and policy-making processes through case study. The methodology and conceptual framework provides a theoretically rigorous, methodologically practical and policy-applicable means for identifying and assessing the impactful social factors that affect the performance of adaptation policy and development interventions at variable governance scales.

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar.

Canadian Cities Explore Additional Measures for Achieving Low Carbon Future

New report highlights current progress, existing challenges and further opportunities for low-carbon development in Canadian cities

A new research report, “Low Carbon Futures in Canada: The Role of Urban Climate Change Mitigation” released today explores Canadian cities’ commitments to urban GHG emissions reduction efforts and outlines concrete opportunities for further action, including shifting focus beyond energy and enlisting federal support for these initiatives.

The report, written by Torrie Smith Associates with the support of Bloomberg Philanthropies and Stockholm Environment Institute, found that Canadian cities and local governments are essential to creating a breakthrough for a low carbon future in Canada. More than 80 percent of Canadian citizens live in the top 10 largest metropolitan areas – making Canada’s population among the most urban globally.  Despite this fact, only 46 percent of Canada’s overall emission footprint is generated in urban areas, compared with the global average of 70 percent. Read more

Pathway to Paris #17: What are the pathways to deep decarbonization?

A biweekly climate briefing for municipalities

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In this Issue #17

  • Another remarkable speech
  • Pathways to Deep Decarbonization
  • The climate justice movement prepares for Paris
  • Game-changing act of diplomacy between US and China
  • Momentum for Change: the best ideas
  • Diplomats raise hopes for deal to cut greenhouse gases
  • Interesting week for Shell
  • Latin America and European cities are least dependent on fossil fuels
  • Pathway to Paris: POP Montreal
  • Featured network: United Cities and Local Governments

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Another remarkable speech

Following shortly on the coattails of a flurry of powerful speeches touching on climate change by the Pope in the US (for example, was a remarkable commentary by the Governor of the Bank of England that sent shockwaves through the business sections of the media. Speaking at Lloyd’s, a major insurance company, Mark Carney pointed out that once climate change becomes a defining issue for financial stability, it may already be too late- he called this the Tragedy of the Horizon. He also pointed to three types of risks:

Read more